Fire Information Link

This site is one of the best to get updated information on all the fires ongoing in California.

http://www.fire.ca.gov/current_incidents

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Featured Image – 12/4/2017

Springs and a marshy area long the Northern Death Valley Fault Zone near the Grapevine Ranger Station in Death Valley, CA.
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Featured Image – 11/30/2017

Section of single-slab concrete bypassed in the early 1930’s just north of Cannon Road in Carlsbad, CA.
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Featured Image – 11/11/2017

South view of the Barnett Ave / Pacific Highway interchange in San Diego, CA where US 80 and US 101 may have split in the past.
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Highway Tips – Roadway Striping

This is the first part of a new series on SoCalRegion where we will discuss various topics related to roadways, their design, signage, as well as other features to help assist all road users in traveling throughout California. Many of these features exist in other states, but some have a different take on things.

Roadway striping comes in a few different colors and designs. Each of these have a meaning. Even without using signs, you can use striping to help determine what is going on with a roadway. Using these clues can also help aid with navigation in unfamiliar areas.

The Basics

Standard double-yellow striping

Let’s start with the basics. Two basic elements of striping are common throughout the United States – yellow means dividing opposing traffic and white means same direction of traffic. These colors remain nearly universal throughout all 50 states. Double striping, no matter the color, denotes a “no passing” or “no crossing” location. Passing, assuming the roadway is two lanes wide, can be done when the stripe on your side is broken. When the whole stripe is broken, both sides can pass.

Divided Roads

Two sets of double yellow stripes dividing a roadway

Multilane highways are divided in a variety of ways. When it comes to striping, there are three main types. The first is still the basic double-yellow striping. When a roadway needs a bit more of a divider, two sets of double yellow stripes are placed. These are considered “painted barriers” and are not to be crossed in any way. Some of these roadways have breaks in the striping, usually on one side only, to allow for turns onto side streets or driveways.

Common center turn lanes are another way to divide a roadway. These can exist even on two lane roadways but are more common on multilane roads. These center lanes are striped with a solid yellow line on the outside and a broken yellow line on the inside. These lanes allow both directions to make left turns.

Common turn lane on a two lane roadway. A sharrow is also visible here.

Freeways

Freeways, while the striping is color coded the same way as regular roads, do have some different styles and meanings. Exit Only lanes, meaning lanes that will exit a freeway shortly, have something Caltrans calls – Elephant Tracks. When a lane is going to leave the freeway, the striping changes in thickness and frequency. These stripes are wider and a little more frequent than regular lane striping. It is one of the visual cues that is designed to help motorists determine if they are in the correct lane, regardless of signage.

Souith at the 163, the “Four Level” interchange in San Diego. Here you can see the transition to exit only striping for State 94 on I-5. Also note the change at the gore point for the shoulder striping.

At the exit itself, the shoulder striping in California has a unique modification. Designed to aid motorists in times of reduced visibility, the shoulder stripe has a break at the exit and flares out to mark the exit. In areas subject to heavy fog, there is an additional exit cue – reflectors. These are off to the side of the shoulder striping at intervals and are in rows of three, two, then one at the exit.

Where most freeways have only one HOV lane, this has two from Adams Ave south to I-105.
118 through the northern San Fernando Valley near Reseda Blvd.

HOV lane striping is another variation found on California freeways. Until a few years ago, these lane were, in general, striped with a double set of double yellow lines, acting as a painted barrier. There were variations based on available space as well. Specific entry/exit points where marked with broken white striping. These stripes are now being changed to double white lines with broken striping at the entry/exit points.

As you can see, there are many ways to determine what is going on with a roadway without looking at signage. Striping help guide road users in ways signage cannot. So, when you are in unfamiliar territory or in conditions where you can’t see the signs, use these clues to help direct you to where you are going. The stripes are there to help!

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New Highway Topics coming soon!

After doing a bit of thinking, I came up with an idea of a new regular feature for the site. I will be posting, with some regularity but no set interval, various topics of regarding highway features. An example, explanations of various types of striping and what they mean. These topics will be California-specific, but some things are more “universal”. Look for the first post in the next few days.

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Highway Cleanup – October 8, 2017

Today, myself and three others cleaned my portion of I-8 and the western US 80 adopted sections. Temperatures were a bit warmer than planned, but still not that bad. A bit more of a breeze would have helped though. We all met at 9 am at Laguna Summit and started with cleaning I-8. There ended up being a bit more trash than I expected, which is ok for a first cleanup. We managed to fill six large bags with trash and left the highway quite clean. US 80, however, was much easier. What little was there only filled one bag halfway.  I do with to thank the volunteers for coming out. It was quite helpful and made the cleanup go fairly smoothly. I do plan another cleanup in a couple of months, this one will include I-8 and both sections of US 80 (Laguna Summit and Jacumba). Temperatures should be nicer by then as well.

End of the cleanup on US 80.
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Adopt-A-Highway Cleanup – Sunday, October 8, 2017

On October 8, I am planning another highway cleanup. This one will be in eastern San Diego County and cover two sections of highway, I-8 at Laguna Summit (Sunrise Highway) and US 80. My section of I-8 runs from the summit to two miles east with about 1/2 of it able to be cleaned. The section of US 80 runs from just below Laguna Summit to two miles east as well. Both roadways should be a fairly easy cleanup. The plan, thus far, is to meet at I-8 and Sunrise Highway / Old Highway 80 at 9 am. Safety equipment, such as hard hats and vests will be supplied. There will be a safety meeting for all the volunteers as well before the cleanup begins. Bring plenty of water and snacks as we will be out there a while. Only those 18 and over can volunteer. Please RSVP as so I can get an idea of how many to expect. So, come on out and help clean some of our counties roadways.

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New section of Adopt-A-Highway now signed!

I’m not quite sure when the sign went up, but it was most likely in the last few weeks. My newest section of Adopt-A-Highway, here in San Diego County, is finally signed.

New signage along I-8 eastbound at Laguna Summit.

Now that it is signed and I have a permit in hand, it is time for a cleanup. Unless temperatures exceed 85 F, I am planning a cleanup of the adopted sections of I-8 and US 80 in the area on October 8, 2017. If you’re interested in joining, let us know!

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Help designate US 99 in Bakersfield as historic!

There is a group in Bakersfield trying to get historic route signs posted on the original alignment of US 99 through the Bakersfield area. They could use your support. Check out the site below for more information.

https://www.gofundme.com/HistoricUS99Kern

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