Category Archives: Advocacy

Adopt-A-Highway Cleanup – May 20, 2017

On May 20, 2017, I am planning a cleanup of my section on I-5 in Grapevine Canyon. Specifically, this is KER-005-6.0/8.0. For those interested in joining, please send us a message to add your name to the list. The plan, thus far, is to meet in Lebec in the morning and carpool to the cleanup site to reduce the number of vehicles along the roadway. Let us know as soon as possible if you are interested in joining us. A partial tour of the remaining sections of US 99 and the Ridge Route in Grapevine Canyon, including Deadman’s Curve, will also be included in the cleanup.

Ridge Route Online Petition

Tumble Inn arch on the Ridge Route
Tumble Inn arch on the Ridge Route

Hello all,

The Ridge Route in Southern California needs your help. The Ridge Route Preservation Organization has put together an online petition to help get the roadway back open and in working order. It has not been fully open to traffic since 2005 and is in need of your support. Please sign this petition to get the legislators and the Angeles National Forest to fix what they did wrong. More details are on the site for the petition.

Thank you for your time and efforts!

https://www.change.org/p/help-save-the-old-ridge-route-road?recruiter=558871232

Website Updates

Three new pages have been added to the site recently. The first, a page on railroads in Riverside County, is still a work in progress but is posted. The second, a list of the sources used for the information on this website, will be a continuous project but has a partial listing at present. The last page has various newspaper articles and television shows that either myself, my website, or both have been featured in.

New website section coming soon

Back when this site was just covering Santa Clarita, it had a section called Civic Information. I plan to bring this back, with a difference. Instead of covering just that city, all incorporated cities in Southern California will be covered. City websites, contact information, and more will be posted. I feel it is important to be able to connect with your local government. We all want something better, why not do so by getting involved ourselves and working towards that goal together?

Traffic Services Requests – City of San Diego

STOP signs coming soon to Balboa Arms Dr and Derrick Dr in the Clairemont area of San Diego, making turns easier and improving pedestrian safety.
STOP signs coming soon to Balboa Arms Dr and Derrick Dr in the Clairemont area of San Diego, making turns easier and improving pedestrian safety.

The City of San Diego has a fairly easy, although somewhat troublesome to find, webpage that allows citizens to make requests for traffic control devices and more. If you’re looking to get a STOP sign installed, red zone added or removed, or most any change to a roadway (not maintenance related), I recommend sending the City a message via their site. The City does take these requests seriously and will investigate them. If, after their survey, the change is indeed warranted, they may make it happen. Keep in mind that these changes will not happen overnight. Some of my requests took months from  start to finish. Just by using that page, I’ve had two stop sign requests and trail crossing signs approved. Anyone can make a positive change to their neighborhood. I’m not special, I just made the requests when I felt those changes would help others and improve safety.

City Of San Diego – Traffic Services Request

Trail Crossing signs in Balboa Park

The City of San Diego recently installed two “Trail Crossing” signs in Balboa Park on Florida Drive near Zoo Place, one in each direction. These signs mark a crossing of a dirt trail that was previously unmarked. I had initially requested that crosswalks be installed as the crossing was not well indicated and Florida Drive is posted at 50 mph. The City said the speed limit was too high but they could install the signs. While it isn’t a perfect solution, it still helps increase safety in the park. Hopefully, the speed limit on Florida Drive will be lowered. It had previously been 45 mph until a few years ago.

Trail Crossing signage at Zoo Place and Florida Drive.
Trail Crossing signage at Zoo Place and Florida Drive.

New Bicycle Law Coming on September 16, 2014

A new law will be enacted in California on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 that requires motorists to pass a bicyclists with a minimum of three feet. This new law – CVC 21760 – is as follows:

21760.

(a) This section shall be known and may be cited as the Three Feet for Safety Act.

(b) The driver of a motor vehicle overtaking and passing a bicycle that is proceeding in the same direction on a highway shall pass in compliance with the requirements of this article applicable to overtaking and passing a vehicle, and shall do so at a safe distance that does not interfere with the safe operation of the overtaken bicycle, having due regard for the size and speed of the motor vehicle and the bicycle, traffic conditions, weather, visibility, and the surface and width of the highway.
(c) A driver of a motor vehicle shall not overtake or pass a bicycle proceeding in the same direction on a highway at a distance of less than three feet between any part of the motor vehicle and any part of the bicycle or its operator.
(d) If the driver of a motor vehicle is unable to comply with subdivision (c), due to traffic or roadway conditions, the driver shall slow to a speed that is reasonable and prudent, and may pass only when doing so would not endanger the safety of the operator of the bicycle, taking into account the size and speed of the motor vehicle and bicycle, traffic conditions, weather, visibility, and surface and width of the highway.
(e) (1) A violation of subdivision (b), (c), or (d) is an infraction punishable by a fine of thirty-five dollars ($35).
(2) If a collision occurs between a motor vehicle and a bicycle causing bodily injury to the operator of the bicycle, and the driver of the motor vehicle is found to be in violation of subdivision (b), (c), or (d), a two-hundred-twenty-dollar ($220) fine shall be imposed on that driver.
(f) This section shall become operative on September 16, 2014.
Remember, give cyclists a break and at least three feet when passing. Safety is everyone’s responsibility and we all share the same roadways.

New Stop Sign in North Park – San Diego

The intersection of Howard Avenue and Alabama Street is a fairly normal intersection. Until today, it was a two-way stop where Alabama St stopped for Howard Ave. This configuration hasn’t been all that successful. Since 2005, there have been four collisions, two of them with injuries. Visibility isn’t great and speeding is common. During peak times, particularly afternoons, traffic can back up on Alabama St due to Howard Ave being busier. To make matters worse, changes resulting from the busway on Park Blvd have added to the traffic on Howard Ave.

A few years ago, I petitioned the City of San Diego to install a stop sign at this intersection. I did so following the first collision and after having a few near collisions of my own. The City initially denied the stop, citing a lack of collisions. They did, however, add two red zones at the intersection on Howard Ave to help increase visibility. It helped for a while. People driving on Howard Ave would still honk at those pulling out from Alabama St that had a hard time seeing traffic coming. Two more collisions occurred before I decided to petition the City again a few months ago. Not long after I did this, yet another collision happened.

After I had sent the City the request, I had a phone conversation with the traffic engineer handling the request. I explained the situation, mentioned the collisions, and the pending traffic pattern changes caused by the construction on Park Blvd. They told me they would inspect the intersection and get back to me. In late June, they called me back. This time, the call was to tell me they had approved the stop sign. It seems that with the four collisions, it now qualified for the upgrade. The next day, I saw the traffic engineer marking locations for the limit lines and signs. I spoke with them, thanking them for the approval. In the process, I was also able to convince them to remove the two red zones since they would no longer be necessary. They did agree to remove them and marked the pavement accordingly.

Last Tuesday, July 15, a City crew came out to install signs informing the public that new stop signs would be added soon.  Today, July 21, another crew came out to install the signs. I had the chance to speak with them and thank them for coming out. The crew that installed the signs was very friendly and worked quite efficiently. They added the signs, lines, and legends to the intersection as well as cleaned up one of the regulatory signs. It didn’t take long for people to start to stop at the intersection. Pedestrians can now cross the intersection easier, traffic on Alabama St can cross Howard Ave easier, two more parking spots have been added, and traffic is now slowed on Howard Ave.

Crew working on the eastbound side - adding striping and removing the red curb.
Crew working on the eastbound side – adding striping and removing the red curb.
Painting over the red curb on the westbound side.
Painting over the red curb on the westbound side.
The new sign makes its first appearance.
The new sign makes its first appearance.
Raising the new STOP sign on the eastbound side.
Raising the new STOP sign on the eastbound side.
STOP sign now in place.
STOP sign now in place.
Finishing up the eastbound side.
Finishing up the eastbound side.
Limit line on the east side being striped.
Limit line on the east side being striped.
Adding the westbound STOP legends.
Adding the westbound STOP legends.
Installing the westbound sign and STOP legends.
Installing the westbound sign and STOP legends.
Finished intersection.
Finished intersection.

It has always been my goal to help improve where I live. Those improvements can come in many ways. Getting potholes filled, signs replaced (or even added in this case), cleaning up trash, having graffiti removed, and even helping neighbors when possible are things that anyone can do. I strongly encourage everyone to help improve their neighborhood and make everyone’s lives better. Together, we can all make our cities a great place to live.