Category Archives: Caltrans

Blue Cut Fire Map – Updated

New Fire Perimeter map available through InciWeb as of 8/17/2016 at 10:30 pm

I-15 will open to Northbound traffic soon as well – Per Caltrans District 8.

All Railroad traffic is still shut down through the pass. I haven’t heard of what BNSF trackage has been damaged but the Union Pacific line has been damaged at Alray. There is no ETA thus far for reopening. This also delays and/or cancels some Amtrak service as well, such as the Southwest Chief from Los Angeles to Chicago.

Blue Cut Fire and Other Wildfire Information

With all the wildfires propping up lately, it is important to stay on top of the news. Your local newspaper and tv stations should be able to give updated information, but you can also get it directly from the agencies involved. I highly recommend the sites listed below as they can give more detailed information about what is going on and are usually updated regularly.

Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination (Fire incident mapping) 
http://www.geomac.gov/

Incident Information System (Mapping and Detailed Incident Reports)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/

Caltrans Road Conditions
http://www.dot.ca.gov/cgi-bin/roads.cgi

California Highway Patrol  Traffic Incident Information (Gives very detailed reports on how these fires affect roadways)
http://cad.chp.ca.gov/

If you have any websites that you would like to share – Please send us feedback or use the comments for this post.

Blue Cut Fire

Fire Perimeter Map from InciWeb as of 8/17/2016 at 8:22 am

In regards to the current fires in the Cajon Pass, I plan to assess the damage to the highways myself once the area is clear. From what I understand so far, it looks like most of the wooden railing along US 66 / 91 / 395 in the pass may be gone, in addition to the historic Summit Inn restaurant at Cajon Summit. Other structures, not associated with the roadway, have also burned. According to CHP, a railroad bridge in the pass has burned, the Alray UP where former US 66 / 91 / 395 passed below. Please stay clear of the Cajon Pass for the duration of this fire.

DETOURS:

If you need to head north toward I-15 and I-40 near Barstow, I recommend taking I-10 East to State 62 East to State 247 North to Barstow. From there, you will connect with I-15 and I-40 just west of their junction. State 247 is a two lane roadway and may be busier than usual, so use caution.

All other traffic should use State 14 through Santa Clarita and the Antelope Valley to connect with points to the north/west of I-15.

Website Updates

Time for a website update!

The first “major” update is an extension of my US 99 tour. I’ve decided to take it north of the Kern River. How far north I have not yet decided, but so far at least as far as Delano to the Tulare County Line. I may push it to Goshen, but we shall see. More photos are necessary as well as more research. Maybe Fresno is in the future, but it will be quite some time away. Right now, I’ve extended the tour two stops north to the Oildale OH, the northern end of the 1933 Bakersfield Bypass.

US 99 in Alhambra, CA

While much of the 1934 Garvey “Superhighway”, former US 60 / US 70 / US 99, has been either built over or completely modified, a small portion remains virtually untouched. In Alhambra, CA, there is a small section of original concrete paving still intact. This section, called Garvey Ave, runs from Ramona Rd to Casuda Canyon Rd.

Looking northerly from Carlos Ave.
Looking northerly from Carlos Ave.
Last intact date stamps on this section, from July 18, 1934 by Jahn and Bressi Contractors.
Last intact date stamps on this section, from July 18, 1934 by Jahn and Bressi Contractors.
Looking southerly from Carlos Ave
Looking southerly from Carlos Ave

At Fremont Ave and Monterey Pass Rd, there are also some grade separations from 1934 that are still intact. These weren’t photographed but videos were made. When I get my video software working again, I will post those.

Website Updates

Over the past week or so, I’ve been working to add more content to the site. Not to avoid completing the existing pages either, just to fill in some gaps. Here are some of the updates:

  • New Website Feature – a new Discussion Forums feature has been added. It is an experiment, so we’ll see where it goes.
  • New SectionCivic Information – These pages give links to every incorporated city in Southern California and give a bit of information about each county as well. The links are finished, but the format is still being worked on.
  • New PageSeeking Old Highways – A while back I was working on putting up a guide to looking for old roads, bridges, and signs. It is still a work-in-progress, but has now been more given its own page in the Highways section.
  • Additional Historic Photos – Old photos of US 101 in the Los Angeles area have been added to the US 101 page.

Image of the Week – 7/17/2016

Four Level Interchange in 1998. US 101 goes left/right and SR-110 goes up/down.
Four Level Interchange in 1998. US 101 goes left/right and SR-110 goes up/down.

Old Highway 78 near Oceanside, CA

State Route 78, one of the original State Highways in the region, has has undergone many changes since it was originally built. Most of the original routing west of Vista, CA, known as Vista Way, has been eliminated by the current alignment of the highway. By the 1960’s, State 78 was an expressway west of Vista, CA. It was gradually upgraded further to a full freeway, bypassing or replacing yet more of the original alignment. Today, there are some original sections still around, albeit very short. The two main sections of old paving, mostly dating to the late 1920’s to early 1930’s, exists near El Camino Real and College Ave in the Oceanside area.

The first section, near El Camino Real, is located on Haymar Dr / S Vista Way and is only partly exposed. Here, the concrete has been repaved but is showing through some of the potholes.

S Vista Way just west of El Camino Real in Oceanside. Note the concrete peeking out from under the asphalt.
S Vista Way just west of El Camino Real in Oceanside. Note the concrete peeking out from under the asphalt.
Closer view of the concrete paving beneath.
Closer view of the concrete paving beneath.

To the east of this section, there is another and more exposed bit of old paving. Adjacent to the Marron Adobe on Haymar Dr (old Vista Way), this paving still retains the feel of the old roadway. No date stamps could be found, but the style of the concrete seems to date it from 1926 to 1935.

Intact section of concrete adjacent to the Marron Adobe.
Intact section of concrete adjacent to the Marron Adobe.
Marker for the Marron Adobe, as in Marron Road "fame".
Marker for the Marron Adobe, as in Marron Road “fame”.

Other sections of older alignments do still exist, but they are all completely reconstructed and no longer retain the old paving.

Image of the Week – 5/2/2016

Tumble Inn arch on the Ridge Route
Tumble Inn arch on the Ridge Route

Image of the Week – 4/9/2016

Downtown Los Angeles and the Hollywood Bowl from Mulholland Drive.
Downtown Los Angeles and the Hollywood Bowl from Mulholland Drive.

US 99 in Indio, CA

Old US 99 still has some gems remaining in the Coachella Valley. On of these is a set of railroad overpasses dating from 1936 and 1956 (56-09R/L). These structures may be replaced in the near future, so I took the opportunity to take some photos of them before they are gone. Each structure is different in type of construction as well as design. The 1936 structure retains its solid concrete railing, something somewhat unique for the period. Most bridges of that era had a more open and arched railing. This bridge has a very much “Art Deco” styling which still looks quite nice today. The bridge carried all US 99 traffic until 1956, when US 99 was upgraded to an expressway through this area. At that time, a second bridge for southbound/eastbound traffic was built. The 1956 span, a steel girder structure, is longer than the 1936 span. This may be due to plans, at that time, to eventually replace the 1936 bridge with a newer and longer span. While these plans may have been initially thwarted by the construction of I-10 on a new alignment east of here, the bridges days are indeed numbered with the reconstruction of the Jefferson St interchange and eventual realignment of roadways in this area.

These bridges are located on Indio Blvd just east of the Jefferson St interchange on I-10 in Indio, CA. Enjoy them while they last.

Detail of 1936 railing and date stamp.
Detail of 1936 railing and date stamp.
Recessed reflectors in the 1936 bridge end caps.
Recessed reflectors in the 1936 bridge end caps.
FAP (Federal Aid Primary) project sign on the 1957 bridge.
FAP (Federal Aid Primary) project sign on the 1956 bridge.
Comparison between the 1936 rail and 1957 rail.
Comparison between the 1936 rail and 1956 rail.
The different lengths of each bridge is well demonstrated in this photo.
The different lengths of each bridge is well demonstrated in this photo.