Category Archives: Caltrans

US 99 in Indio, CA

Old US 99 still has some gems remaining in the Coachella Valley. On of these is a set of railroad overpasses dating from 1936 and 1956 (56-09R/L). These structures may be replaced in the near future, so I took the opportunity to take some photos of them before they are gone. Each structure is different in type of construction as well as design. The 1936 structure retains its solid concrete railing, something somewhat unique for the period. Most bridges of that era had a more open and arched railing. This bridge has a very much “Art Deco” styling which still looks quite nice today. The bridge carried all US 99 traffic until 1956, when US 99 was upgraded to an expressway through this area. At that time, a second bridge for southbound/eastbound traffic was built. The 1956 span, a steel girder structure, is longer than the 1936 span. This may be due to plans, at that time, to eventually replace the 1936 bridge with a newer and longer span. While these plans may have been initially thwarted by the construction of I-10 on a new alignment east of here, the bridges days are indeed numbered with the reconstruction of the Jefferson St interchange and eventual realignment of roadways in this area.

These bridges are located on Indio Blvd just east of the Jefferson St interchange on I-10 in Indio, CA. Enjoy them while they last.

Detail of 1936 railing and date stamp.
Detail of 1936 railing and date stamp.
Recessed reflectors in the 1936 bridge end caps.
Recessed reflectors in the 1936 bridge end caps.
FAP (Federal Aid Primary) project sign on the 1957 bridge.
FAP (Federal Aid Primary) project sign on the 1956 bridge.
Comparison between the 1936 rail and 1957 rail.
Comparison between the 1936 rail and 1956 rail.
The different lengths of each bridge is well demonstrated in this photo.
The different lengths of each bridge is well demonstrated in this photo.

Image of the Week – 2/24/2016

Cruising US 99 near Beaumont, CA.
Cruising US 99 near Beaumont, CA.

Image of the Week – 1/31/2016

The Arroyo Seco Parkway near Orange Grove Ave in South Pasadena, CA.
The Arroyo Seco Parkway near Orange Grove Ave in South Pasadena, CA.

Old concrete near Riverside, CA

In the Belltown area of Riverside, CA, I found a rather interesting concrete roadway on 24th St. It appears to be a part of a former alignment of either Rubidoux Blvd, Market Street, or combination of the two. It dates to August 1931 and is in very good shape. What I found most interesting was the curve at Avalon St, which seemed to suggest its former importance as a Riverside to Colton roadway.

Looking westerly toward Avalon St on 24th St.
Looking westerly toward Avalon St on 24th St.
Curve at Avalon St, looking easterly.
Curve at Avalon St, looking easterly.
Date stamp from August 20, 1931.
Date stamp from August 20, 1931.

Why this roadway was built and when it was bypassed may remain a mystery for some time, however, it does show that you can still find old treasures like this in Southern California.

Image of the Week – 12/27/2015

Old US 99 near Coolidge Springs, Imperial County, CA with the shoreline of Lake Cahuilla visible in the background.
Old US 99 near Coolidge Springs, Imperial County, CA with the shoreline of Lake Cahuilla visible in the background.

Old US 99 at Weldon Summit

US 99, known as “The Old Road” in the Santa Clarita area, has had a varied past. It was first built through this area in 1930 as a three-lane highway. This roadway, known then as the Newhall Alternate, would be the first of many versions of the road through this pass.

This is the last remaining uncovered stretch of the 1930 Newhall Alternate concrete. Motorcycle is on the 1951 alignment.
This is the last remaining uncovered stretch of the 1930 Newhall Alternate concrete. Motorcycle is on the 1951 alignment.

In 1949, the roadway was temporarily widened to four lanes by restriping and adding some paving to the shoulder. This was done as the real work to upgrade the highway wouldn’t commence for a couple of years. Evidence of this widening can still be seen today.

Double white striping from a "temporary" four-lane configuration of the old three-lane concrete. This was done in 1949 as an interim measure before the road was reconstructed as an expressway in 1951.
Double white striping from a “temporary” four-lane configuration of the old three-lane concrete. This was done in 1949 as an interim measure before the road was reconstructed as an expressway in 1951.

In 1951, US 99 was realigned and finally upgraded to an expressway, though this would not last long. Just south of this point, the highway was realigned again to accomodate a new freeway from the Tunnel Station Junction (US 6 and Foothill Blvd) to Sepulveda Junction (State Route 7). This freeway still exists today in part and serves as the “Truck Route” through the pass.

North view of the old southbound lanes just south of the summit.
North view of the old southbound lanes just south of the summit.

Starting in 1967 and ending in 1975, the pass was yet again the site of major construction. This time, little of the old highway would be utilized as the new route of Interstate 5 bypassed much of the existing route. Where it didn’t bypass the alignment, it was torn up and completely replaced with the current roadway.

US 99 would, however, serve as the main route one last time following the January 17, 1994 Reseda / Northridge earthquake. Portions of I-5 collapsed during the earthquake, resulting in a need for a quick replacement. The resulting detours created an alignment very similar to the pre-1967 highway, giving motorists (albeit not with joy) a chance to drive old US 99 again. Upgrades were made to the highway through the pass including repaving, guardrail, and a temporary prohibition on left turns. Sadly, for highway historians, this resulted in the loss of the 1951 concrete and some curbing. It is a price to pay to help keep California’s Backbone functioning during a crisis.

Looking northerly toward Gavin Canyon. This was the location where I-5 was temporarily rerouted onto old US 99 in 1994.
Looking northerly toward Gavin Canyon. This was the location where I-5 was temporarily rerouted onto old US 99 in 1994.

Ridge Route Centennial Celebration Coming Soon!

99_old_shield_big

This year, the Ridge Route will be celebrating its 100 year anniversary. While the roadway is still not fully open to travel and has not been since January 2005, it is still there and still coming up to its century mark. This celebration will be held in Lebec at the El Tejon School, located near the top of Grapevine Grade on Lebec Road. For more information, please contact the Ridge Route Communities Museum. The road also needs your help and pressure to reopen the roadway to the public. For more information about this issue, contact the Ridge Route website.

From the Ridge Route Communities website:

Centennial

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION – 10/3

It has been 100 years since the Ridge Route Road opened

Come celebrate with the Ridge Route Preservation Organization and the Ridge Route Communities Museum & Historical Society

from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

at El Tejon School right on the old two lane highway

across I-5 from Fort Tejon

There will be displays, antique automobiles, food, music,

souvenirs and a panel of speakers at 1 p.m.

Also that day there will be a

Living History Program at Fort Tejon

Image of the Week – 9/13/15

Former US 466 near Caliente in the Tehachapi Mountains. This is one of the longest remaining sections of original wooden railing in California.
Former US 466 near Caliente in the Tehachapi Mountains. This is one of the longest remaining sections of original wooden railing in California.

Highway Resources Page

I’ve recently added a new section to the socalregion website. I noticed the site was lacking in resources for local roadways. In particular, information on how to contact various local agencies for road projects, logs, and maintenance. With this in mind, I’ve added a new page to help others get their roads fixed and find out more information about those roadways. I’ve called it the “Southern California Highway Resources” page, which can be found on the Southern California Highways page and via this link.

Image of the Week – 8/15/15

Former North Burbank UP, now removed, along old US 99 in the San Fernando Valley. Built 1941.
Former North Burbank UP, now removed, along old US 99 in the San Fernando Valley. Built 1941.