Category Archives: KLR 650

New Ridge Route Video, sort of

After finally resolving some software issues, I have finally been able to start editing and posting videos again. My most recent one was taken in November 2015 along the Ridge Route from the Tumble Inn to State 138 at Neenach. It shows some of the issues the road is facing presently regarding erosion and a lack of maintenance.

Storm Damage Updates – Tejon Pass Area

This weekend, I had the opportunity to survey the damage from the recent storms in the Tejon Pass / Grapevine area. I took my motorcycle, as I expected to need extra clearance on some of the roadways I was going to take. The results of the survey were better than expected, mostly.

My 2014 Kawasaki KLR 650 and the Ridge Route near Martins.
My 2014 Kawasaki KLR 650 and the Ridge Route near Martins.

Ridge Route:

While I was only able to inspect the Ridge Route from State 138 south to the Tumble Inn, I was pleased to see how little damage was done to the roadway. As it has also been a while since I have been able to travel this section, I had to go by what I had heard and knew of the pre-existing damage. The bulk of the roadway was seemingly untouched by the recent storms. Only two sections, one with an existing problem, were a problem. One of those sections in particular, just south of Liebre Summit, is nearly impassable by a standard clearance automobile.

Grapevine Canyon:

Deadmans Curve with slide damage visible behind it and on the slopes above.
Deadmans Curve with slide damage visible behind it and on the slopes above.
Rills in the slopes from the mudslides. Note the bare slopes which didn't help matters at all.
Rills in the slopes from the mudslides. Note the bare slopes which didn’t help matters at all.

Mudslides, due to a locally heavy rainfall, closed Interstate 5 through this canyon for some time. Mudslide damage is still very apparent from near Ft Tejon north to near the lower escape ramp. Most of the slides affected the northbound lanes. These slides buried a significant section of former US 99 paving, especially between PM 5.5 and 6.0. While a more detailed inspection will be done later, it appeared that most of the exposed Ridge Route concrete along the northbound side was intact, with the later US 99 concrete being buried. The southbound lanes were also hit, though most of the old highway sections were still intact and relatively untouched.

Overall, the damage from these storms was very localized. As we approach a possibly strong El Nino winter, it is my hope that this storm was not a preview of things to come. As this winter progresses, this site will try to document the changes to our historic roadways throughout Southern California.

Ridge Route and US 99 Update Coming

This weekend, I am travelling to the Liebre Mountains to inspect the damage from the recent storms on the Ridge Route, Grapevine Canyon, and the Ridge Route Alternate. I plan to inspect in detail those sections and take lots of photos. Updates on the status of the roadway will be initially via my Twitter account (@SocalRegionWeb) with a post update following. The sections I plan to cover in detail are Palomas Canyon (Five Mile Grade), Three Mile Grade, Ridge Route from State 138 to the Tumble Inn, Tejon Pass, and Grapevine Canyon. I’ll be taking my 2014 Kawasaki KLR 650 which will allow me access to more of the highway. Stay tuned for updates.

Jackrabbit Trail – November 14, 2013

On Thursday, November 14, 2013, I had the opportunity to travel Jackrabbit Trail for this first time in many years. I took my new motorcycle, a 2014 Kawasaki KLR 650, which was well suited for the trip. Jackrabbit Trail is a roadway through the Badlands near Moreno Valley that has an interesting history. It was originally built in 1915 as a part of the Riverside to Beaumont Highway, later US 60/70. In 1923-24, the roadway was paved with asphalt. Some of this still exists today. In 1936, the roadway was bypassed by the current route of Hwy 60. However, in 1956, the roadway was rehabilitated for use as US 60 again, albeit temporarily, while the current route was being widened to a four lane expressway. Following this brief use, the old Jackrabbit Trail fell into disuse and eventually was abandoned. The County no longer maintains the road and just posts “Road Closed” signs at either end. It is, however, still a through route, with some landslide and washout problems.

1953 topographical map showing Jackrabbit Trail between US 60 and Gilman Springs Road.
1953 USGS topographical map showing Jackrabbit Trail between US 60 and Gilman Springs Road.
Looking north from Gilman Springs Road
Looking north from Gilman Springs Road

My journey took me over the entire route in both directions, as the southern roadway was closed for reconstruction. I was rather amazed to see how much old railing still exists along the roadway, most of which is from the 1920’s. In many ways, this road is similar to the Ridge Route north of Los Angeles on old US 99. It was built around the same time and bypassed around the same time. The only major difference is that the Ridge Route was not reused by the highway department after it was bypassed. The roadway also offers some rather scenic views of the area. Mt San Gorgonio stays in view when heading north and the lake bed of Mystic Lake is quite visible to the south. I highly recommend this road as an alternative to SR-60 and is good for bicycling as well.

My KLR 650 out on the highway.
My KLR 650 out on the highway.
1950's railing and 1950's paving
1950’s railing and 1950’s paving
Original railing and Mt San Gorgonio
Original railing and Mt San Gorgonio
Deep cuts near the summit
Deep cuts near the summit
Northern end of the trail
Northern end of the trail
Original railing near the northern end
Original railing near the northern end