Category Archives: Riverside County

New Feature Coming Soon – Cucamonga Valley Wineries

As this website is dedicated to providing the best coverage possible for a wide variety of subjects, it is time for another expansion. This time, the wineries of the Cucamonga Valley will be covered. These remaining wineries are a part of the history of the area and of California winemaking. We expect to have this new page up and running in the next month or so. Stay tuned for updates.

Victoria Bridge in Riverside, CA

Built in 1928, the Victoria Bridge crosses the Tequesquite Arroyo in style. This bridge was built to carry streetcars on Victoria Avenue across the arroyo as well as auto and horse carriage traffic. It is a rare example in Southern California of an arch bridge of this magnitude crossing a generally dry location. The deck and railing were restored in the early 2000’s to their original 1920’s appearance.

Victoria Avenue in the Riverside area itself is a rather beautiful roadway to travel. It was constructed in the early 1900’s as such a roadway and retains most of the original features today, south of this bridge. Quite a few miles of the roadway are comprised of a two-lane divided roadway surrounded by orange groves. These orange groves comprise some of the last remaining groves in Southern California. It is significant as the Riverside area was home to the original orange groves that were planted in the late 1800’s in Southern California.

Side view showing the multiple arch span.
Side view showing the multiple arch span.
Deck view with the restored railing and lighting.
Deck view with the restored railing and lighting.
New dedication plaque.
New dedication plaque.

Los Angeles And Salt Lake Railroad – Santa Ana River Bridge

In the Jurupa area of Riverside, there is a really neat old railroad bridge. Built in 1904, it was a part of the former San Pedro, Los Angeles, and Salt Lake Railroad, a subsidiary of the Union Pacific Railroad. This bridge is fairly unique in Southern California in that it is a concrete arch design instead of the usual steel truss type. As it is also a single-track bridge, additional traffic may warrant an additional span.

View of the west side of the span.
View of the west side of the span.
Deck view showing the single-track and architectural features
Deck view showing the single-track and architectural features
Santa Ana River above the bridge. This section of the river is open and not channelized.
Santa Ana River above the bridge. This section of the river is open and not channelized.
Detail of the architectural features.
Detail of the architectural features.

Following old US 91 near Corona

I took a trip recently to the Corona area to check out some of the old alignments of US 91. I had been there before, but it has been a long time. Starting from the Green River exit off of the 91 Freeway, I headed east along the south side of the freeway. Here, the roadways named Green River Road and Palisades Drive cover the pre-freeway alignment of US 91. This section is also a portion of the 1939 Prado Dam Relocation. This realignment took the highway out of the riverbed to the north and pushed it closer to the hills. A significant portion remains today relatively intact.

Near the Green River Road interchange, an abandoned portion of the roadbed is revealed by a 1939 culvert. The pavement has long since been removed. A portion of the old median, complete with curb divots, remains to the east. The best portion, however, is on Palisades Drive. This section has a fairly continuous old median, old bridges, wooden railing, and even a mile marker from Route 91. This whole section was bypassed in the early 1970’s along with a change to the 91 / 71 interchange.

Abandoned section of US 91 near Green River Road.
Abandoned section of US 91 near Green River Road.
1939 culvert on the abandoned section.
1939 culvert on the abandoned section.
Old raised median on Green River Road.
Old raised median on Green River Road.
Section of Palisades Drive, restriped to two lanes from four. Old raised median and wooden railing are visible here.
Section of Palisades Drive, restriped to two lanes from four. Old raised median and wooden railing are visible here.
Nice section of intact wooden railing.
Nice section of intact wooden railing.
Old Route 91 milemarker.
Old Route 91 milemarker. Reads “091, RIV, mileage illegible”
Former onramp from SB State 71 to WB US 91.
Former onramp from SB State 71 to WB US 91.
1939 bridge and railing near the eastern end.
1939 bridge and railing near the eastern end.

Jackrabbit Trail – November 14, 2013

On Thursday, November 14, 2013, I had the opportunity to travel Jackrabbit Trail for this first time in many years. I took my new motorcycle, a 2014 Kawasaki KLR 650, which was well suited for the trip. Jackrabbit Trail is a roadway through the Badlands near Moreno Valley that has an interesting history. It was originally built in 1915 as a part of the Riverside to Beaumont Highway, later US 60/70. In 1923-24, the roadway was paved with asphalt. Some of this still exists today. In 1936, the roadway was bypassed by the current route of Hwy 60. However, in 1956, the roadway was rehabilitated for use as US 60 again, albeit temporarily, while the current route was being widened to a four lane expressway. Following this brief use, the old Jackrabbit Trail fell into disuse and eventually was abandoned. The County no longer maintains the road and just posts “Road Closed” signs at either end. It is, however, still a through route, with some landslide and washout problems.

1953 topographical map showing Jackrabbit Trail between US 60 and Gilman Springs Road.
1953 USGS topographical map showing Jackrabbit Trail between US 60 and Gilman Springs Road.
Looking north from Gilman Springs Road
Looking north from Gilman Springs Road

My journey took me over the entire route in both directions, as the southern roadway was closed for reconstruction. I was rather amazed to see how much old railing still exists along the roadway, most of which is from the 1920’s. In many ways, this road is similar to the Ridge Route north of Los Angeles on old US 99. It was built around the same time and bypassed around the same time. The only major difference is that the Ridge Route was not reused by the highway department after it was bypassed. The roadway also offers some rather scenic views of the area. Mt San Gorgonio stays in view when heading north and the lake bed of Mystic Lake is quite visible to the south. I highly recommend this road as an alternative to SR-60 and is good for bicycling as well.

My KLR 650 out on the highway.
My KLR 650 out on the highway.
1950's railing and 1950's paving
1950’s railing and 1950’s paving
Original railing and Mt San Gorgonio
Original railing and Mt San Gorgonio
Deep cuts near the summit
Deep cuts near the summit
Northern end of the trail
Northern end of the trail
Original railing near the northern end
Original railing near the northern end

Mystery bridge over the San Jacinto River

On Sunday, June 16, I went on a motorcycle ride out toward Palm Springs. On Hwy 74 just east of Hemet, I stopped to inspect an abandoned concrete arch bridge to the side of the current bridge. The “new” span, where Hwy 74 crosses today, was built in 1929. This makes the abandoned span most likely from the 1910’s. It appears to have been longer, though the rest is long since washed away. I originally saw this bridge on a previous motorcycle ride, having missed it on every driving trip through here. It just goes to show that you see more on two wheels – be they motorcycle or bicycle wheels.

Last remaining arch
Last remaining arch
Evidence the bridge continued west. It looks like there may have been an additional arch span.
Evidence the bridge continued west. It looks like there may have been an additional arch span.
Looking east across the bridge deck toward current Hwy 74.
Looking east across the bridge deck toward current Hwy 74.
Current 1929 bridge across the river. Abandoned span is about 50 feet to the left.
Current 1929 bridge across the river. Abandoned span is about 50 feet to the left.
Detail of the railing on the bridge. Note the 90 degree end to the railing instead of the curved ends used later.
Detail of the railing on the bridge. Note the 90 degree end to the railing instead of the curved ends used later.

After leaving the bridge, I headed east on Hwy 74 up into the mountains. The roadway was recently repaved, which was badly needed. The new pavement was quite fun to ride, even with the extra twisty passing areas. The tires seemed to grip the road better allowing me to ride faster than I did before. I didn’t originally plan to go all the way to Palm Springs, but somehow I decided “Why Not?” and did it anyway. It was rather hot while I was there, so I didn’t stay long. Leaving town was almost as difficult as dealing with the heat. Strong west winds, typical for the area, were blowing and made riding somewhat unnerving at times. The winds finally subsided once I got to the Beaumont area and temperatures decreased quite a bit as well.

Seven Level Hill on Hwy 74 heading into Palm Desert.
Seven Level Hill on Hwy 74 heading into Palm Desert.

Redlands and old US 99 – Sunday, March 20, 2011

On Sunday, I went to the Redlands area to drop off a friend. I figured, why not see some old highway in the area and make the trip back more fun? So, after dropping him off, I headed over to Redlands Blvd. This is a section of old US 99 that still retains its concrete paving from the late 1940’s. I never really got any photos of it before, so it was good to see it still there. From Citrus Ave east, the roadway is more of an expressway, with a wide median and limited access.

After Redlands, the next section of old highway would prove a bit more interesting to get to. It was a short section of concrete paving, from the 1920’s most likely, and was located adjacent to the 10 freeway.  I had to actually pull off the freeway shoulder to drive the short section. It was pretty neat, seeing as how this had been realigned so many times since that concrete was poured. I was hoping to return to the freeway by simply driving through. That idea was quickly thwarted when I found a tall curb at the shoulder. I had to back up and get on where I pulled off. So much for trying to be inconspicuous!

Redlands Blvd, "in town"
Redlands Blvd, “in town”
Divided section of Redlands Blvd, like an expressway.
Divided section of Redlands Blvd, like an expressway.
Some of the concrete visible... seen just to the right of the shoulder.
Some of the concrete visible… seen just to the right of the shoulder.
More paving, both lanes now visible.
More paving, both lanes now visible.

My next stop would be Robert Rd, near Cherry Valley Blvd. This section is threatened with removal or repaving as it is adjacent to a new large housing tract. So far, it is still intact. This nice concrete section dates to about 1928 and is one of the last sections of intact concrete around here. I took many photos here, hoping they wouldn’t be my last. The economic slowdown seems to have helped here, as the housing tract construction has slowed dramatically. At this point, I figured, I’ve gone this far… might as well go to the 60 junction and look around. So, I got back on the freeway, and took the San Timoteo Canyon Road exit. A frontage road heads east here, on the south side of the freeway. A portion of it is old US 99, complete with a 1939 bridge over San Timoteo Creek. Upon closer inspection of the bridge, I found that the eastbound I-10 bridge was also a part of old US 99. It was the original westbound bridge for the expressway, built in 1951. Now traffic is going the wrong way over it, from a historical context. One final stop was to be made, the old US 99 / US 60 / US 70 junction at the edge of Beaumont.

Short section of Roberts Rd that is now a driveway.
Short section of Roberts Rd that is now a driveway.
Roberts Rd, fairly pristine 1920's concrete.
Roberts Rd, fairly pristine 1920’s concrete.
San Timoteo Creek Bridge from 1939
San Timoteo Creek Bridge from 1939
Old westbound bridge from 1950, now eastbound I-10.
Old westbound bridge from 1950, now eastbound I-10.

I’d seen what appeared to be bridge piers and concrete approaches to an old bridge just north of the current SR-60. It turns out, that is exactly what they were. In 1936, the current westbound bridge for SR-60 (old US 60), was built. It replaced an earlier bridge, the one that I had been seeing pieces of. Today was finally my chance to walk around and see the old pieces. I was rather amazed at how much was left, considering how long ago it was all torn out. A fair amount of the eastern approach to the bridge remained, most of it buried under a thin layer of dirt. There wasn’t anything left of the western approach. I also got some photos of the exit sign for the 60 West from the 10 East. The sign was from 1960, and was overlaid with a SR-60 sign. Yes, there is a US 60 shield under there… just hope the overlay panel falls off at some point! After hiking around, it was time to head back. The approaching storm was getting worse, and the winds were picking up. I had a long drive ahead, and didn’t really want to do it in heavy rain. Thankfully, all I had to deal with was heavy winds and dust at times. I finally got to see some sections of old US 99 that I either hadn’t seen before, or weren’t sure were still around. More trips will be made up this way, just not during summer.

1936 Beaumont Overhead, now westbound SR-60
1936 Beaumont Overhead, now westbound SR-60
Remains of the earlier Beaumont Overhead
Remains of the earlier Beaumont Overhead
Some of the old approach still exists, with concrete.
Some of the old approach still exists, with concrete.
The SR-60 shield is on top of a US 60 shield.
The SR-60 shield is on top of a US 60 shield.