Category Archives: Roads

Blue Cut Fire Damage – Highways

On September 6, 2016, I finally got a chance to survey the damage to the roadways in Cajon Pass that were involved in the Blue Cut Fire. Portions of the area are still closed, specifically the area north of Cajon Junction, so I was unable to access the Alray UP or the abandoned expressway sections in that area.

I was, however, able to inspect State 138 east of I-15 and all of old US 66 / 91 / 395 south of Cajon Junction. I chose not to investigate State 138 west of I-15 as there was a lot of heavy construction in progress for a four-lane widening project.

I started my journey by taking the “new” Cajon Blvd alignment that bypasses Devore Junction (I-15 and I-215). Caltrans has recently completed reconstruction of this interchange and as part of that reconstruction, they have partly rebuilt Cajon Blvd through here. While much of it is a new alignment, it does follow the original alignment (pre-1937). As a result, I was able to get some nice photos of part of that alignment.

New section of Cajon Blvd adjacent of I-15, south of Kenwood Road.
New section of Cajon Blvd adjacent of I-15, south of Kenwood Road.
Looking southerly along Cajon Blvd toward I-15.
Looking southerly along Cajon Blvd toward I-15.
Pre-1937 alignment of US 66 / 395 running along the base of the cliff.
Pre-1937 alignment of US 66 / 395 running along the base of the cliff.

The burn area itself became very apparent after Kenwood Road. The fire in this area burned as far as Keenbrook, damaging many structures in that area. A few things didn’t get burned though. One, a lone sign that says “EAT” along with its accompanying structure, remained intact. At Blue Cut, the source of the fire, I was rather amazed at what didn’t burn. Most of the cottonwood and oak trees survived untouched as well as most of the guardrail in the median of the expressway.

Just north of Kenwood Road looking toward Keenbrook. Burn area is evident near the trees in the distance as well as in the mountains.
Just north of Kenwood Road looking toward Keenbrook. Burn area is evident near the trees in the distance as well as in the mountains.
South end of Blue Cut showing fire damage.
South end of Blue Cut showing fire damage.
Looking westerly at Blue Cut. The fire burned all around here, but left most of the trees intact.
Looking westerly at Blue Cut. The fire burned all around here, but left most of the trees intact.
At Blue Cut, looking easterly. Despite the name of the fire, it didn't do that much damage here.
At Blue Cut, looking easterly. Despite the name of the fire, it didn’t do that much damage here.

North of Blue Cut, the burn area stops mostly at the old highway, but not east of it. The wooden railing is still intact at Debris Cone Creek. Some structures were damaged near Cajon Junction, such as the Chevron gas station and the McDonalds restaurant.

Looking northerly from the Cleghorn Creek Bridge toward Cleghorn Road. Utility crews are visible in the distance.
Looking northerly from the Debris Cone Creek Bridge toward Cleghorn Road. Utility crews are visible in the distance.
1939 bridge over Debris Cone Creek. Concrete K-rail was added later to protect the wooden railing.
1939 bridge over Debris Cone Creek. Concrete K-rail was added later to protect the wooden railing.
Side view of the 1939 Debris Cone Creek Bridge with its 1952 counterpart. The cross beams in the railing were removed at some point in the past few years.
Side view of the 1939 Debris Cone Creek Bridge with its 1952 counterpart. The cross beams in the railing were removed at some point in the past few years. The fire burnt up to the edge of the 1952 span.
Old railing just south of Cajon Junction, just missed by the fire.
Old railing just south of Cajon Junction, just missed by the fire.

After Cajon Junction, I followed State 138 east toward Summit. The burn area covered the entire highway from Cajon Junction to Summit Valley Road. This section is scheduled to be realigned in the near future as well.

Hwy 138 and the Cajon Amphitheater from Summit.
Hwy 138 and the Cajon Amphitheater from Summit.

Overall, most of the old highways through the Cajon Pass remained intact. Some guardrail was damaged but most was only lightly burned. How this area will react during the next few major rain storms does remain to be seen. Hopefully, mudslides and debris flows don’t become the order of the day.

Wigwags – Part 3

Wigwags, or properly Magnetic Flagman, are a rare sight in Southern California. Recently, I found two more located in Gardena, CA along a former Pacific Electric freight spur. Today, the Union Pacific Railroad operates this stretch to service a lumber yard
at Western Ave. Both of these wigwags are just southeast of the intersection of Western Ave and 166th St.

On Denker Ave south of 166th St.
On Denker Ave south of 166th St.
Wigwag on Hobart Blvd south of 166th St.
Wigwag on Hobart Blvd south of 166th St.

See Also:

Blue Cut Fire and Other Wildfire Information

With all the wildfires propping up lately, it is important to stay on top of the news. Your local newspaper and tv stations should be able to give updated information, but you can also get it directly from the agencies involved. I highly recommend the sites listed below as they can give more detailed information about what is going on and are usually updated regularly.

Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination (Fire incident mapping) 
http://www.geomac.gov/

Incident Information System (Mapping and Detailed Incident Reports)
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/

Caltrans Road Conditions
http://www.dot.ca.gov/cgi-bin/roads.cgi

California Highway Patrol  Traffic Incident Information (Gives very detailed reports on how these fires affect roadways)
http://cad.chp.ca.gov/

If you have any websites that you would like to share – Please send us feedback or use the comments for this post.

Blue Cut Fire

Fire Perimeter Map from InciWeb as of 8/17/2016 at 8:22 am

In regards to the current fires in the Cajon Pass, I plan to assess the damage to the highways myself once the area is clear. From what I understand so far, it looks like most of the wooden railing along US 66 / 91 / 395 in the pass may be gone, in addition to the historic Summit Inn restaurant at Cajon Summit. Other structures, not associated with the roadway, have also burned. According to CHP, a railroad bridge in the pass has burned, the Alray UP where former US 66 / 91 / 395 passed below. Please stay clear of the Cajon Pass for the duration of this fire.

DETOURS:

If you need to head north toward I-15 and I-40 near Barstow, I recommend taking I-10 East to State 62 East to State 247 North to Barstow. From there, you will connect with I-15 and I-40 just west of their junction. State 247 is a two lane roadway and may be busier than usual, so use caution.

All other traffic should use State 14 through Santa Clarita and the Antelope Valley to connect with points to the north/west of I-15.

US 99 in Alhambra, CA

While much of the 1934 Garvey “Superhighway”, former US 60 / US 70 / US 99, has been either built over or completely modified, a small portion remains virtually untouched. In Alhambra, CA, there is a small section of original concrete paving still intact. This section, called Garvey Ave, runs from Ramona Rd to Casuda Canyon Rd.

Looking northerly from Carlos Ave.
Looking northerly from Carlos Ave.
Last intact date stamps on this section, from July 18, 1934 by Jahn and Bressi Contractors.
Last intact date stamps on this section, from July 18, 1934 by Jahn and Bressi Contractors.
Looking southerly from Carlos Ave
Looking southerly from Carlos Ave

At Fremont Ave and Monterey Pass Rd, there are also some grade separations from 1934 that are still intact. These weren’t photographed but videos were made. When I get my video software working again, I will post those.

Old Highway 78 near Oceanside, CA

State Route 78, one of the original State Highways in the region, has has undergone many changes since it was originally built. Most of the original routing west of Vista, CA, known as Vista Way, has been eliminated by the current alignment of the highway. By the 1960’s, State 78 was an expressway west of Vista, CA. It was gradually upgraded further to a full freeway, bypassing or replacing yet more of the original alignment. Today, there are some original sections still around, albeit very short. The two main sections of old paving, mostly dating to the late 1920’s to early 1930’s, exists near El Camino Real and College Ave in the Oceanside area.

The first section, near El Camino Real, is located on Haymar Dr / S Vista Way and is only partly exposed. Here, the concrete has been repaved but is showing through some of the potholes.

S Vista Way just west of El Camino Real in Oceanside. Note the concrete peeking out from under the asphalt.
S Vista Way just west of El Camino Real in Oceanside. Note the concrete peeking out from under the asphalt.
Closer view of the concrete paving beneath.
Closer view of the concrete paving beneath.

To the east of this section, there is another and more exposed bit of old paving. Adjacent to the Marron Adobe on Haymar Dr (old Vista Way), this paving still retains the feel of the old roadway. No date stamps could be found, but the style of the concrete seems to date it from 1926 to 1935.

Intact section of concrete adjacent to the Marron Adobe.
Intact section of concrete adjacent to the Marron Adobe.
Marker for the Marron Adobe, as in Marron Road "fame".
Marker for the Marron Adobe, as in Marron Road “fame”.

Other sections of older alignments do still exist, but they are all completely reconstructed and no longer retain the old paving.

Traffic Services Requests – City of San Diego

STOP signs coming soon to Balboa Arms Dr and Derrick Dr in the Clairemont area of San Diego, making turns easier and improving pedestrian safety.
STOP signs coming soon to Balboa Arms Dr and Derrick Dr in the Clairemont area of San Diego, making turns easier and improving pedestrian safety.

The City of San Diego has a fairly easy, although somewhat troublesome to find, webpage that allows citizens to make requests for traffic control devices and more. If you’re looking to get a STOP sign installed, red zone added or removed, or most any change to a roadway (not maintenance related), I recommend sending the City a message via their site. The City does take these requests seriously and will investigate them. If, after their survey, the change is indeed warranted, they may make it happen. Keep in mind that these changes will not happen overnight. Some of my requests took months from  start to finish. Just by using that page, I’ve had two stop sign requests and trail crossing signs approved. Anyone can make a positive change to their neighborhood. I’m not special, I just made the requests when I felt those changes would help others and improve safety.

City Of San Diego – Traffic Services Request