San Diego Geology – Sea Caves

La Jolla

The sea caves at La Jolla Cove are some of the best in Southern California. They are formed within fractured sandstones and mudstones of the Cretaceous Point Loma Formation. Deep within some of these caves, flowstone, stalactites, and stalagmites exist. Negative tides, particularly in the -1.0+ range, allow for hiking to most of the caves with relative ease. I still recommend a wetsuit for such a hike, as it can get a bit wet at times.

View of the caves, at low tide (-1.8 feet) in January 2008. The area in green at the bottom is usually well under water.
View of the caves, at low tide (-1.8 feet) in January 2008. The area in green at the bottom is usually well under water.
With the cave "Shopping Cart", these soda-straw stalactites are growing.
With the cave “Shopping Cart”, these soda-straw stalactites are growing.
This cave, known as White Lady, displays a wonderful flowstone, with cementation of the cobbles visible on the lower left. Note the terraced pools and algal growth
This cave, known as White Lady, displays a wonderful flowstone, with cementation of the cobbles visible on the lower left. Note the terraced pools and algal growth
Here, terraces have also formed, with small pools and a larger algal growth. At the center, the cavity goes on for at least another foot. Also visible are some larger cobbles cemented with flowstone.
Here, terraces have also formed, with small pools and a larger algal growth. At the center, the cavity goes on for at least another foot. Also visible are some larger cobbles cemented with flowstone.
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